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queequeg

Reliable FinTec Inner arms.

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Might be worth while to look into casting them using silicone molds.

http://www.theengineerguy.com/OOMOO-25.html 

There are some good urethane plastics out there too which might be good candidates to fill the molds with.

https://www.smooth-on.com/products/epoxacast-655-101-hardener/

How far down the rabbit hole do you want to go is the question you need to ask yourself.

 

Has anyone tried contacting F2 directly to see if the sell replacement parts?  Shooting them emails now to see what comes back....

Edited by *Ace*

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Had a response from the North American distributor which is Mordiff Distribution.

http://mordiff-distribution.com/?page_id=30

 

The response is:

"Unfortunately no, I do not have availability for any parts for heels.  You can order new heels at

www.yyzcanuck.com in Canada or

www.donek.com in the US"

 

Waiting to hear back from F2 International.

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45 minutes ago, *Ace* said:

Had a response from the North American distributor which is Mordiff Distribution.

http://mordiff-distribution.com/?page_id=30

 

The response is:

"Unfortunately no, I do not have availability for any parts for heels.  You can order new heels at

www.yyzcanuck.com in Canada or

www.donek.com in the US"

 

Waiting to hear back from F2 International.

Interesting - their response makes sense to me: no money in selling these parts I imagine.

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A friend had some custom motor mounts cast in aluminum for a weird project car.  He supplied them with the pattern made of plywood and modeling clay, they made a sand-mold from that and cast the parts.  He needed to drill holes and such, but said it was surprisingly low cost.  Something like $40 for the two pieces, which he then needed to drill to finish.  You could use original Bomber or F2 arms for the pattern.  

Maybe this is an option?  The machining afterwards needs to be pretty high quality, probably a bit above what could be done by the average person with a drill press.  

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Probably easiest to machine them from stock from the get-go instead of dealing with casting. Just the finishing operations from casting would cost more than the entire machining operation.  Another advantage of machining is more freedom of materials.

For small parts the cost would be low for a reasonable batch. 

 

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13 minutes ago, erazz said:

Probably easiest to machine them from stock from the get-go instead of dealing with casting. Just the finishing operations from casting would cost more than the entire machining operation.  Another advantage of machining is more freedom of materials.

For small parts the cost would be low for a reasonable batch. 

 

I looked into machining. Pretty expensive (for a one-off) i’m not looking to do a big batch. Right now the 3d printed options seem best.

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So with all the engineers on here, nobody has tried to 3d print these in nylon or petg yet?  I sold my pair to someone that needed parts, but it couldn't take more than an hour to model one and another couple to print.  Actually Tom likes the polycarbonate as the strongest material right now:

 

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Who said nobody tried to print it? Maybe nobody has successfully printed it :cool:

 

Long story short it's not strong enough when printing it with an FDM printer.  I haven't given up but haven't succeeded yet - hence the silence on the issue.

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Do you have a solid model?  In general the reason printed parts are not strong enough is because people do not redesign them to be strong enough.  If you copy the existing design, it will most likely fail, but if you design the part with appropriate dimensions for a 3d printed part, it might work.  Unfortunately, you'll need a model of the entire mechanism to see how mods affect the function within the space available.

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Did you already post photos somewhere of the broken pieces? That would probably push the parts geeks over the edge of re-design bliss.

Also, given the relatively low physical volume of each part, investment casting out of brass alloy might be cost effective for a small run. 

 

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12 hours ago, Donek said:

Do you have a solid model?  In general the reason printed parts are not strong enough is because people do not redesign them to be strong enough.  If you copy the existing design, it will most likely fail, but if you design the part with appropriate dimensions for a 3d printed part, it might work.  Unfortunately, you'll need a model of the entire mechanism to see how mods affect the function within the space available.

Not yet. This is something I don’t know a lot about and have (zero) experience with but would like to learn. I have a bunch of other projects going on between work and other hobbies at the moment, but I’m interested in using this as an opportunity to learn (hopefully in the coming months).

i figure if I can get one printed out of metal with the process I posted earlier that would (hopefully) be sufficient. Being able to make spares that aren’t any stronger than the original part would also be good, if not nearly as great.

12 hours ago, Beckmann AG said:

Did you already post photos somewhere of the broken pieces? That would probably push the parts geeks over the edge of re-design bliss.

Also, given the relatively low physical volume of each part, investment casting out of brass alloy might be cost effective for a small run. 

 

The central arm/lever snapped on the long side which seems pretty predictable. IIRC : same place all the others did. 

Edited by queequeg

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