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How you guys feeling about new soft boot carving phenomenon?

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IMG_2092.JPGWhile not really a new thing, where carving an edge is concerned, dragging ass in this stance is. 

Thanks again for the hookup, my dearest Jack Michaud. 

Donek Sasquatch 170 28w full camber  

Photo cred to Steve "Riceball" Recsky at NES 2018. 

Edited by Rob Stevens

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Well, this is what the new softboot carving looks like, as most people who aspire to it will use my angles rather than yours. Besides... if I wanted to bank a lazy carve with my hip 2 feet off the deck, I could go out and do that, but that's pretty 1988, by my reckoning.

I'm looking to do what hasn't been done, or at least isn't commonly being done by folks who otherwise use the most versatile stance for everything else  

Either way though, unless you incline a lot as you appear to like, every rider regardless of stance will use hip angulation.  When someone with low angles angulates at the hip, the ass is displaced out over the edge, rather than to the tail. 

The trick as I see it is to flex all the useful joints evenly and stay in alignment to the back foot, front foot and anywhere in between, as needed.

When the butt really sticks out in this stance, it's usually some kind of "hedging" when moving for maximum edging. The rider expects that the heels will drag and boot out, so they remain overly forward leaning at the waist, prepared to save themselves. I know I'm not going to boot out, so I can maintain more vertical alignment and relax my torso into the turn, while keeping my centre of mass closer to the midline of the board. I see the position I'm in as very close to how it would be if I were standing flat based and simply compressed straight down.

There is a small amount of displacement of ass to the side, but that's how it is, my Friend.

This kind of carving is what's next. At least it's the next kind of carving that has a chance to be next. If it were hardboot alpine, it would have caught on by now. If it were high angle softboots, it would have caught on by now. You never know though... riders with everyday angles could think this sucks too and mainstream "carving" will still be any type of sleepy riding that leaves a narrow track.

This is the way to do it. If you don't like it, look away. The other guys on this thread who stand this way and myself can keep talking. 

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Rob, read my post...Stickin your Butt out, is a Style choice...no where did I say it was Bad!! or that that Style is bad...:ph34r:   you're Awesome OK :1luvu:

and yea, I been riding the Wave a certain way for a long time...each of us here has our ways 

Wonder if our Frontside turn is so different though... :ph34r:

 

 

frontside.jpg

Edited by softbootsurfer

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5 hours ago, softbootsurfer said:

Stickin your butt out is a Style choice, it is not required for a good cutback...

Thanks Arnaud

 

Arnaud.JPG

Yeah we do! Our frontside doesn't look too different to me. Nothing better than turning without trying!

As a surfer, I think you'd dig the board in this photo. If the leash doesn't break, you won't have to swim back to shore!

 

cmh pow-surf.jpg

Edited by Rob Stevens

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1 hour ago, west carven said:

howdy rob

you are so late to the game... dragging ass is poor form... you are doing it all wrong...

 

Best of breed, these guys. Little cranked in the back foot for my taste, but most sick. I'd like to think that this is how I ride, when I'm at my best.

Edited by Rob Stevens

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2 hours ago, Rob Stevens said:

By that, I'm sure you mean the turn style and not the hammered on helmet and goggles. 

 

Because that's a nice turn. Plus, you aren't wearing your goggle strap under the helmet... so you've got that going for you.

Edited by Rob Stevens

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14 hours ago, west carven said:

howdy

this is how the pro's do it...

U may want to read the posts about "bias" before something bad happens.  

wtf17b2sm.jpg.edbbe6cd60cca3f43b1821e468f3c6ab~2.jpg

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howdy sic t 2

ha! good eye... I  now put the toe strap across the top of my boot... there is very little overhang...

it's just the angle of the of the photo... my toe side are as deep/laid out as you can go...

toeside.jpg

Edited by west carven

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1 hour ago, west carven said:

howdy sic t 2

ha! good eye... I  now put the toe strap across the top of my boot... there is very little overhang...

it's just the angle of the of the photo... my toe side are as deep/laid out as you can go...

toeside.jpg

:ph34r: funny...for years, others have looked at how I put my Toe Straps on top of my foot and said, "that is not Right!"  once you wear out the strap from snow contact on your turn, it wasn't hard to figure out to simply move it in over the Toes, were I actually think it gives me a better feel as well... :biggthump

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So - I've been reading most of this thread. I began life as a skier, migrated to softboots, and then have been working at hardboots for quite a while. I have not been able to carve in hardboots consistently and am now thinking that I never will. I really admire those on the east coast who can rail on very firm snow (I cannot). If the snow gets that hard here in Colorado, I will likely stay home. 

So - I'm now thinking I will try to optimize my softboot carving. I'd like to get a dedicated softboot carving board. Based on this thread, it looks like the likely candidates are: Endeavor Hammerhead (can't find one), Coiler BXFR (have to order one), maybe a Moss Snowstick (hard to find) or maybe a Donek Flux or Knapton Twin Tip. Is there any consensus on which of these might be best? I can drive over to Donek, talk to them & buy or order one. 

I have an older Burton Supermodel that carves OK an I have an Arbor Steepwater that I have never ridden. Might this be a good candidate for a softboot carver?

Thanks

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17 minutes ago, Roy Envy said:

Speaking (at least a little bit) about canting, where can a person even get cant plates for soft boot bindings these days?  I've been looking all over and I can't find anything!  

Rome bindings come with different canted footbeds flat and either 2.5/3 degree

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10 minutes ago, John E said:

So - I've been reading most of this thread. I began life as a skier, migrated to softboots, and then have been working at hardboots for quite a while. I have not been able to carve in hardboots consistently and am now thinking that I never will. I really admire those on the east coast who can rail on very firm snow (I cannot). If the snow gets that hard here in Colorado, I will likely stay home. 

So - I'm now thinking I will try to optimize my softboot carving. I'd like to get a dedicated softboot carving board. Based on this thread, it looks like the likely candidates are: Endeavor Hammerhead (can't find one), Coiler BXFR (have to order one), maybe a Moss Snowstick (hard to find) or maybe a Donek Flux or Knapton Twin Tip. Is there any consensus on which of these might be best? I can drive over to Donek, talk to them & buy or order one. 

I have an older Burton Supermodel that carves OK an I have an Arbor Steepwater that I have never ridden. Might this be a good candidate for a softboot carver?

Thanks

I think there is no consensus as of what is the best. Depends on conditions and each person.

Best value and for trying numerous this year? Fullbag diamond blade. You surely will be happy.

Here is my quiver.

 

20180209_110217.jpg

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46 minutes ago, John E said:

So - I've been reading most of this thread. I began life as a skier, migrated to softboots, and then have been working at hardboots for quite a while. I have not been able to carve in hardboots consistently and am now thinking that I never will. I really admire those on the east coast who can rail on very firm snow (I cannot). If the snow gets that hard here in Colorado, I will likely stay home. 

So - I'm now thinking I will try to optimize my softboot carving. I'd like to get a dedicated softboot carving board. Based on this thread, it looks like the likely candidates are: Endeavor Hammerhead (can't find one), Coiler BXFR (have to order one), maybe a Moss Snowstick (hard to find) or maybe a Donek Flux or Knapton Twin Tip. Is there any consensus on which of these might be best? I can drive over to Donek, talk to them & buy or order one. 

I have an older Burton Supermodel that carves OK an I have an Arbor Steepwater that I have never ridden. Might this be a good candidate for a softboot carver?

Thanks

I've tried @slopestar's Donek Saber and have really liked it. He rips on it!  I think your plan of driving over and having a chat with Sean is probably a good idea regardless. Once I recover from this year's taxes I'll probably do the same.

 

59 minutes ago, Roy Envy said:

Speaking (at least a little bit) about canting, where can a person even get cant plates for soft boot bindings these days?  I've been looking all over and I can't find anything!  

The gold solution used to be the Bomber Power plates IMHO. We all hope they'll start making them again.

With that being off the table I've been 3D printing cants/risers with great success. There's a thread over in the Binding section which documents that. 

Other than that ebay and the classifieds here are your best bet.

 

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42 minutes ago, Poloturbo said:

I think there is no consensus as of what is the best. Depends on conditions and each person.

Best value and for trying numerous this year? Fullbag diamond blade. You surely will be happy.

Here is my quiver.

 

20180209_110217.jpg

Awesome.  Just by looking at those decks, I guess the most playful and versatile one would be the Blade.

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