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noschoolrider

Member
  • Content count

    386
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About noschoolrider

  • Rank
    Groomer Grommet

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.donrichter.com

Converted

  • Location
    Bend, OR
  • Home Mountain/Resort?
    Mt Bachelor
  • Occupation?
    Snowboard Coach
  • Snowboarding since
    1986
  • Hardbooting since
    1989

Recent Profile Visitors

464 profile views
  1. JJ Anderson Gold

    A lot of what you are saying is correct. However, you should not exclude the additional experience a 40 year old has. Even when one racer has a physical advantage such as younger, heavier (it's a gravity sport), taller (more leverage), or more strength, the racer without any of those physical advantages can still win if they make better choices and apply the most effective technique for each turn/situation (turns/courses/conditions vary). JJA applied his experience and made the best choices for that course and those conditions (that course was similar to the course he won Olympic gold on). I'm 5'7", 135 pounds (and old) and I race PGS on 180 and 185 Kesslers with plates. I beat younger, taller, heavier, stronger racers most of the time, and I have also won several national championships. When someone my size and age has results like that it indicates they use a successful combination of technique, skill and experience. However, since I'm my own coach, if you want to say my results have nothing to do with experience and are only due to better coaching - then that's fine with me :) I also want to make it clear that there are several BOL members I know who are faster than me including Kenneth Boivin and Everett McEwan. Everyone I know (including me) agrees with you on that. However, carving is only quicker than sliding/skidding when that carve does not take the racer out of the faster line. Even with a blended range of sidecuts sometimes it is necessary to drift/skid/pivot/redirect - it deepens upon the offset/course. So... Why have the courses changed? It's a gravity sport, which means bigger/heavier racers have a huge advantage. If every race course was set to favor only pure carved turns (with no technical challenges) then the biggest and best gliders would always win. The changes in the courses (that made them more difficult/technical) level the playing field and give smaller/lighter/older racers an equal/better opportunity to win. In that situation, you must become a better technical racer to be successful.
  2. JJ Anderson Gold

    The discussion was about Jasey-Jay Anderson and racing. As I have stated, the reason I included links to those articles is because they contain debatable alternatives to the conviction that the racer who carves all the time always wins. Drift/skid/pivot/redirect turns are nothing new, however they are still something that every successful ski and snowboard racer needs to be able to perform proficiently. I agree that some of the articles are lacking and have technical inaccuracies, but again I referenced them to show that (for racers) there other types of turns that are necessary to use in some situations. If you don't believe me or don't care it's no big deal. However, I will not put up will bullies or self-righteous people telling me what is or is not debatable, or what I can or cannot post. I have no respect for that type of behavior.
  3. JJ Anderson Gold

    Like your criticism of the articles? No, I do not and I find it funny that you think I do. As I said, I was posting debatable alternatives to a common conviction. You replied, "That conviction isn't worthy of debate". I don't care one way or the other because I'm not seeking your opinion on anything. I'm not seeking your approval or agreement. I don't care if you disagree with everything I write. It does not matter to me. I do not feel insulted - your self-righteous attitude is comical. You have repeatedly attempted to position yourself as being superior to Chris Knight (U.S. Ski & Snowboard Team women's speed coach), Ron LeMaster (former technical advisor to the U.S. Ski Team), and Dr. Jim Taylor by making disparaging comments about their articles and their writing abilities, and you haven't provided any compelling reasons why I should listen to you. I do not respect that method of persuasion - you keep trying to make it about the quality of their articles when it's your behavior that I don't respect. Does little to affect me, but reflects poorly on you, and for what? I thought it was ironic and funny that you called articles written by fellow professionals 'self important' while you were acting in a self important manner. FYI, I don't need you to tell me what to think, or what I shouldn't read, or what I shouldn't share or discuss with others. I do my own critical thinking and I make my own decisions. Your behavior is the definition of self important and that is why I wrote that 'little gem'. If you can't see the irony in that, then maybe you need to work on self awareness and you might need to get a sense of humor.
  4. JJ Anderson Gold

    The courses vary based on course setter choice, location (including steepness and width of the hill) and snow/weather conditions.
  5. JJ Anderson Gold

    And at this point in time, that problem is almost entirely self-imposed. So, the fact that a snowboard racer can't skate in a race course, or use two edges at the same time, or move from one ski to another is self-imposed at this point in time? No, that's why I asked. How passive-aggressive of you. Knock it off. Denigrate me if you feel it advances your cause, but don't waste your time time on 'creative writing'. You feel you were criticized unfairly? I'll make a note of your sensitivity. Would you feel better if all my responses start with 'With all due respect' to mitigate the effect of any disagreement or criticism? However, if you don't like what I write and you are sensitive to criticism, then maybe you should ignore what I write. FYI, I can't think of (or find) a single instance where I have initiated communication with you. I have only responded to you when you have initiated communication with me. Also, you don't have the right or authority to tell me what I can or cannot post.
  6. JJ Anderson Gold

    Old man Bode Miller became the oldest Olympic medalist in alpine history for a number of reasons. Among them, the fact that he is physically predisposed to ski well. Also the fact that he eschewed conventional wisdom for a better way to ski, something the establishment can't seem to accept or figure out. And also, when you've skied as long and as well as he did, you make a crap-load of mistakes, mistakes which nicely informed his storied success. He is an anomaly though. Most racers peak and fade earlier in life. Is your banter detector broken? You didn't catch that I wrote "old man Bode Miller" as a teasing response to BlueB's (Boris') comment, "The very fact that an old man is winning where he probably shouldn't"? FYI, I'm older than Bode and Jasey-Jay, so I'm the real old man. The purpose of including the blurb about Bode Miller was to add a short tidbit that serves as a witty reply to Boris' comment and as a setup for my attempt to get Boris' detailed opinion of what is so "very wrong with the current state of snowboard racing". The blurb about Bode only works well in that context if it's short and sweet (that's why I used only one sentence). I like the six sentences you wrote about Bode, however that amount of content would have been way too big/wordy to serve my purpose (banter). Um, yea, Boris wrote, "The very fact that an old man is winning where he probably shouldn't" Snowboard racers have fewer options than ski racers when it comes to creating/increasing energy/speed and improving their line. In some situations, it is beneficial for snowboard racers to use rebound energy to increase/maintain speed. Up-unweighting is useful in situations where it results in more speed than the other choices would provide. Example: Pumping the board to increase/maintain speed (this is only beneficial/effective at lower speeds). I also thought I made it clear that I think using rebound to be 'Jumpy' is not using rebound in an efficient/beneficial manner. That is why I wrote, "Jasey-Jay also did a better job of keeping his board in contact with the snow (most of the time), which was the best choice (faster) for that course." I also believe that the more time the board spends in the air the more that speed/time are lost. I also find it mind-boggling that so many snowboard racers continue to deliberately let their boards move far above the snow (and spend so much time in the air), instead of trying to use rebound energy to move forward (versus more upward) and/or do a better job of keeping their boards in contact with the snow. With all due respect Don, if you buy into this kind of antiquated/self important information, you're doing yourself a disservice. Don't sugarcoat it, tell me how you really feel :) The quote you used above is from my positive reply to Jack's comment in which Jack indicated he believed Jasey-Jay's win was partly because "he carves more and better than most others". The reason I included the links to those articles is because they contain debatable alternatives to the conviction that the racer who carves the most all the time always wins. Do you to believe that conviction is not debatable? If you have links to subject related articles/information that you believe are less antiquated/self important then please feel free to share, because I'm always seeking more knowledge and alternatives to experiment with. When read I your comments (in various topics/threads), I get the impression you despise modern snowboard racing and that you also don't like modern snowboard equipment? Do I have the wrong impression? Anyway, do you have any proof that your superior knowledge and information leads to the best results in snowboard racing (e.g. national championship wins or world cup wins)? *************************** For entertainment purposes only :) Which of the following best describes a self important person? 1. A person who is sharing articles (written by professionals) that they think others might find interesting. Or 2. A person who thinks every professional in the race community is wrong except for them, and that they know more than every snowboard race equipment builder and every coach.
  7. JJ Anderson Gold

    You're welcome, and thank you for your openness and honesty. Some negative feelings/perspectives about the FIS are understandably due to what happened to the International Snowboard Federation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Snowboard_Federation) and because of the anti-hard-boot attitude that resulted in major changes to Bordercross courses. Yea, I also enjoyed watching races on courses like the one in the 1998 Nagano Olympics, and I also understand why some people don't care for modern snowboard racing (I like it)... But, it is what it is, and I think that anything (like racing) that gives alpine snowboarding more exposure is good for the sport. That event looks like fun and Sigi Grabner is a fun guy and a great businessman. However, that type of event does not specifically showcase (or benefit) alpine snowboarding and obviously that's not Sigi's intention. Like you said, it's more of an exposition event, and it's also good for Sigi's snowboard business.
  8. JJ Anderson Gold

    Good comments Jack. Everything you stated are part of why Jasey-Jay won that race. However, there is one obvious (in my opinion) technique that Jasey-Jay used to create more speed. Watch how Jasey-Jay was using rebound to extend his body upward so he could more effectively (and aggressively) pressure the edge (pump) at the top of the turns (right as he enters the fall-line), which resulted in more speed. Because the course was on a moderate slope and had a bigger off-set (similar to the course he won Olympic gold on), Jasey-Jay had the right conditions to do more carving and to create additional speed by pumping. Jasey-Jay also did a better job of keeping his board in contact with the snow (most of the time), which was the best choice (faster) for that course. The mistake he made (shown in slow motion) was caused by over-pressuring the edge as he hit the washboard ruts, however he had enough speed and momentum (and skill/experience) to recover. Determination, training, skill and experience are a winning combination. Here are some educational articles that race enthusiasts might find interesting: https://deadspin.com/ted-ligety-is-skidding-his-way-to-a-skiing-revolution-1526280295 https://www.skiracing.com/stories/shiffrin-in-soelden-from-good-skiing-to-fast-skiing http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/skidding-SR6_TechTalk.pdf http://www.effectiveskiing.com/Topic/Stivot http://www.ronlemaster.com/presentations/USSA-symposium-Copper-Mt-2015.pdf
  9. JJ Anderson Gold

    Jumpy is not a style - what you're seeing is rebound, which sometimes is not used in the most efficient/beneficial manner. The courses vary based on course setter choice, location (including steepness and width of the hill) and snow/weather conditions. Look at the difference between the 2002 Olympic course and the course in Bansko that JJA just won on. JJA was the fastest because he used the best technique for that course and those conditions, and he obviously trained hard to get physically ready. So, just like 'old man' Bode Miller, Jasey-Jay's win was due to his determination, training, skill and experience. The majority of the racers and spectators disagree with your opinion. The parallel format attracts a lot more spectators than the single course format did. In most parallel races, spectators can see the entire race from the finish area, the parallel events have a faster pace, the head-to-head format is more exciting, and spectators get to watch the best racers make more runs. Most people don't want to watch alpine snowboarders do the same single course race format as skiers (the ski racers are a lot faster). FIS alpine snowboard events in Europe and Asia have a large fan base and great spectator attendance. Other than the 2002 and 2010 Olympics, the alpine snowboard events in North America have very poor support/attendance. They already have an event that has most of what you want and it's not very popular - Red Bull Edge by Sigi Grabner:
  10. JJ Anderson Gold

    Actually, it's the opposite of what you believe. Spectator attendance of the single course races was declining because people did not want to watch alpine snowboarders do the same races as skiers (the ski racers were faster so their races were more exciting to watch). FIS switched alpine snowboard races to the parallel format to save alpine snowboard racing and it worked. The parallel format attracts a lot more spectators than the single course format did. In most parallel races, spectators can see the entire race from the finish area, the parallel events have a faster pace, the head-to-head format is more exciting, and spectators get to watch the best racers make more runs.
  11. Snowboard (non) development

    Relax, all right? My old man is a television repairman, he's got this ultimate set of tools. I can fix it… By converting it...
  12. Alpine Snowboard Plate Systems

    Edwin Coratti has been using this...
  13. JJ Anderson Gold

    When 'old man' Bode Miller became the oldest Olympic medalist in alpine skiing history most experts said his win was due to his determination, training, skill and experience. However, when Jasey-Jay wins a world cup event at 42 you say it's because "something is very wrong with the current state of snowboard racing". Would you prefer snowboard competitions that have perfectly-rounded drawn-out turns (which would slow the competitors down) and 2' high limbo bars (to force competitors into fully laid out body slides) and have judges give extra credit based on who made the prettiest turns? I'm interested in your detailed opinion of what is so "very wrong with the current state of snowboard racing". Please feel free to include the usual comments about how metal boards and plate systems create a negative image of the sport, and about how metal boards and plates are responsible for racing becoming lost to a 'down the line path' where racers just throw their boards around (like two athletes racing pogo sticks downhill). The following information and videos might help you refine your opinion: Shortly after the 1998 Olympics several European snowboard racers were asked for their opinions about Jasey-Jay Anderson's race technique and the general consensus was: Jasey-Jay is too aggressive - he is a risk taker who throws his board around too much. Philipp Schoch - 2002 Olympics Men's Parallel Giant Slalom (you need to use the link below because YouTube will not allow that video to be embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07Ds4-9DdTE Philipp Schoch - 2006 Olympics Men's Parallel Giant Slalom (you need to use the link below because YouTube will not allow that video to be embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8so8H_fCJZA Jasey-Jay Anderson - 2010 Olympics Men's Parallel Giant Slalom (you need to use the link below because YouTube will not allow that video to be embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB79JDyYYa8 Vic Wild - 2014 Olympics Men's Parallel Giant Slalom (you need to use the link below because YouTube will not allow that video to be embedded): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDilQWhZxfk FIS Rogla - 2018 Men's Parallel Giant Slalom snowboard race highlights FIS Bansko - 2018 Men's Parallel Giant Slalom snowboard race highlights
  14. Snowboard (non) development

    Sorry, I forgot to include the names of the boards for images 2 & 3 - I fixed it in my original post. If you meant the one in the second image that little beauty is the 2014 Cross Board (the third image is a PTC Multi Edge Snowboard / Deuce) https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2014/07/meet-the-cross-board-one-aussies-decades-long-journey-to-revolutionise-snowboarding/ I have not tried the Cross Board and I think both companies are out of business (their websites are expired), but I tried one like it about 27 years ago. Even back then, it was not as much fun as a low end Sims or Burton board. Here is one of the versions by Deuce (it looks like a skidder):
  15. Snowboard (non) development

    alpinegirl beat me to it on the Hobie (double edge snowboard) and Jib Tech, I mean Lib Tech is trying to bring it back from the dead: Not my cup of tea... Hobie - Double Edge Snowboard Deuce Snowboards - Dual Edge Snowboard (DES) Lib Tech DUH XC2 BTX - Double Edge Snowboard Cross Board (below) PTC Multi Edge Snowboard / Deuce (below)
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