Leaderboard


Popular Content

Showing most liked content since 12/18/2016 in all areas

  1. Hello alpine riders! It´s been a while since my last video ... 3 years! ... damn! ;-) This time I teamed up with a very good friend - Frank (danger in the forum) from Germany. He is a real alpine snowboarding fanatic and lives for the sport 24/7! So he was a perfect partner for the project! Together we have almost 60 years of snowboarding experience, but we both still have that special shimmer in our eyes whenever we are allowed to hit the slopes. Alpine snowboarding is such an amazing sport and an unbelievable thrill!!! Spread the vibe and keep up the alpine snowboarding spirit! We are still going strong!!! The bomber community is amazing! https://vimeo.com/198577215 Please leave a comment and share the spirit!!!
    11 likes
  2. The Result Coiler Energy 174 0.4 Titanal hand delivered by Bruce at Quebec Carving session yesterday. Did not had the chance to ride it yet as I got injured . Incredible topsheet made By Nicolas (Technik) Under Coiler, 3e planète à partir du soleil means: Made on the third planet from the sun Taken from this Tintin comic
    10 likes
  3. Won a Coiler Carving board @ Quebec Sessions 2017 New .5 custom, blunt note & tail. The ButcherBlock. Two Tone Topsheet length 33.5 width 23.5cm effective edge 25cm taper 0mm Bamboo core Best of all, signed by Bruce. It is a carving board, no? Thanks Bruce for this unique board!
    10 likes
  4. A classic problem! So classic that we made a clinic mostly around this issue. See if this helps you: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TVw_2hYefjA
    10 likes
  5. As you may know, I've kind of been changing the direction of my snowboarding. Trying to really rail on the edges like many of you do was a fun expiriment and I have no regrets. However to appeal to a much larger audience I'm going back to something more relatable to the masses. Happy Shredding All.
    8 likes
  6. People such as myself prefer unambiguous and concrete discriptors, which is why I've been using "poop-side" and "pee-side" for years. The looks on people's faces suggest they know exactly what I mean and are astonished by my genius.
    8 likes
  7. Here are a couple of Amplids just out of the box. Amplid is Peter Bauer's company. I found Amplid last year because they make the Milligram, the lightest carbon splitboard on the market. It is super light and I was so impressed by its performance, Rebecca got her own Milligram (right side) this season. I added an UNW8 (left side) for myself, Peter's signature board, because I figure it is going to be a ripping softboot carver.
    8 likes
  8. Here is the picture of comparing F2 and SG binding below. I had it for about 10 days and rode it for 4 days on the slope. The constructions and adjustment of toe/heel blocks are very similar to F2. However, SG binding uses hex key for all bolts instead of Pozi drive in F2. I really like the hex key because it is less prone to stripping and the hex key is much more portable while out on the slope if adjustment is needed. As I wanted to try different setting, SG binding were much easier to adjust lift, cant shims than F2 bindings. Yes, you have to take it off from snowboard, however, you don't need to move the toe/heel blocks like in F2 binding which was super annoying when changing cant, lift shims. Also, SG bindings comes with 2 sets of both lift and cant shims (and longer screws) but F2 only came with 1 of each, hence, I had to buy another dealer as I ride both toe and heel lift. Construction of SG binding is very sturdy and well made. Comparing the plastic of F2 and SG, it is evident that SG uses better plastic construction than F2. SG binding is slightly heavier than F2 but it is very negligible difference. It is not overly stiff but still have that lateral flex people seek in F2 binding. I had problem with F2 binding dragging on the snow when I unclipped but i never have that problem with SG binding. When clipping in, the SG binding has better "snap" than F2 in my opinion but I guess it is subjective. The only downside is the cost. SG binding is about $100 more than F2 binding. But in my opinion, SG binding is worth it as it is easily adjustable, bit more stiffer than F2 but not as stiff as metal binding which is what I was looking for. Also SG snowboard company has one of the best customer service hands down, hence, for me that counts a lot. Even sigi chips into answer some of the questions.
    8 likes
  9. ... when you are on a carving board, and have bought the best possible knife to the gunfight. This weekend I went up to ride on Saturday. The day before had been hard packed to icy, there was no new snow, and it was overcast and flat lighted (my least favourite conditions). If I hadn't bought a 2 day pass I might not even have bothered. But I went up, to discover that it was snowing lightly at the top, slightly warmer temps had given the snow some grip, there was plenty of visibility between the trees, and hot damn, they've groomed every black pitch on two chairs perfectly flat. I left a collection of circles all over the back of the mountain, and rode until I was so bagged, I practically fell down the frontside to get down to the bar. Always remember, there are way more groomer days than powder days in a season ... and when everyone else is moaning about the lack of freshies, your day couldn't be better.
    7 likes
  10. 7 likes
  11. 7 likes
  12. I learned a lot in my 2.5hr session today. No, I am not laying out Euro or Extreme carves but I did get the tail to follow the nose a lot. I learned that it's ok to scrub off speed with a giant skid to get back to where you can ride the edge. I learned that whether I am in my Sx91s, 325s, 700s, Ultra Prime 69, Coiler Nirvana 172 or et al., it makes little difference. You either bust your balls to ride the edge or you don't. At my stage I must control my speed with the occasional skid in order to get back to the sweet spot for a turn or two. A glass of wine or a good stout beer improves the attitude enough to compensate for what loss of balance and coordination one may suffer. More determination is the net result for me. Angles, cants, lifts etc., just ride. Most fun I've on a board since 2005.
    6 likes
  13. I know, I know... not carving... but it's some of the best side-slipping in the game! :D Also confirmed I'll be helping Sean again at the ATC, so can't wait to shred with a bunch of you again!
    6 likes
  14. I make motor noises and shift gears on transitions sometimes But that's only because I'm so mature mario
    6 likes
  15. Since everyone is posting, here's my only coiler. It's not a great pic as I don't have one handy but it's definitely a rare vintage ride. 195 Pure Race split tail (torsion bars not pictured)
    6 likes
  16. I grew up with a mother that made everyone miserable with her painful ski boots, but never had any problems until a few years ago. I can definitely say my feet get worse every year. Fin Doyle has compared me to a prom date. All I do is complain about my shoes.
    6 likes
  17. Jim asked me to read through this thread and give my input because this is somewhere we haven't been 100% on the same page either and we continue to discuss. The goal of the Hardbooting Community naming was to be approachable to riders who don't necessarily want to drag their armpit on the ground but may be more attracted to hardbooting knowing that it's also accessible for all mountain riding. In fact, we're about even in new-to-hardboot customers who want straight carving equipment versus those seeking all mountain and/or powder set-ups. That said, these people, on the whole, aren't on the forum. So this begs the question of how to leverage the forum best, both for our business and for readership's interest. And here's where things get tricky because, let's face it, the hard carving, arm pit dragging part of the sport is the sexy one yet half of our customer base is looking for all mountain accessible equipment. As many of you know, neither Jim nor I are - or want to be - carving elitists. We enjoy riding everything from hero groom to 20+" of fresh, bumps and trees (like this past Saturday!) and believe many other riders do (or will) feel the same. At this point, it comes down to semantics, and we're at a point where we have to figure out what the point of the forum really is. It seems to me that what people are largely looking for is a place to come to chat about carving, regardless of the type of boots on your feet. But, with the all mountain market growing (even though they don't seem to be active on the forum), we don't want to seem too exclusive of ONLY being about carving. It's like a catch-22 and chicken and the egg all the same time. So what I've suggested is that instead of segregating by equipment - I am still not a fan of a SB sub forum - let's differentiate by terrain and riding style. If someone is seeking advice on riding powder or bumps in hardboots, I feel that would be fine to have in a second forum with specific content to that type of riding. I think this is an option that will keep us (Jim and I and now Bomber) true to our message that hardboots aren't exclusive to carving while allowing a place for carving chatter to take place. So, the Hardbooting Forum (previously the Carving Community) is going to become Carving Central - we too fell out of favor with the word Community once we thought about it. Then, Jim is creating a second forum called All Mountain Hardbooting. We will work on moving appropriate threads to the new forum over time. We're a little slammed now, so it may take awhile and will ask the moderators to look for new topics that belong in the new area instead. It seems like a good compromise that won't dilute the carving content, won't exclude those who don't fruit boot and won't make people feel their only option is to dig a 4" deep trench. Hopefully you agree. But I also know this is an age old "battle" that will never end and and
    6 likes
  18. The softboot carving "revival" in mainstream snowboarding comes from the japanese snowsurfing and carving movement that has been going on there for a while. There's been a scene with specialized boards going for a few years. As Japan has become an annual destination of choice for most european and north american pros, they have been exposed to that scene and the "new" shaped boards, and have picked up on it. It has even influenced some pros to drop the high injury risk freestyle contest and video part scene to join a simpler and soulful approach to riding. Mainstream manufacturers and media have simply followed. Less spins and more style is always a good thing.
    6 likes
  19. 6 likes
  20. My new to me Oxess SBX 163 (12m sidecut, 143cm effective edge, 26cm waist) carbon and titanal construction with Apex Gecko Stealth plates and Flow NX2-GT bindings. A carbon and metal Softboot Carving Machine. Thanks to bomber member A.Lael as board is awesome.
    6 likes
  21. I see that - each to their own. Of course it's a "whole system" thing too - maybe we trade flex in one part for another (eg Bomber people may need more flexible boots than F2 people). Anything new, absolutely, amazingly we're not yet dead as a sport...
    5 likes
  22. Fedex delivered my new JJSB Clear 162 (well topsheet says 162 but it's really a 163 with a 20cm waist). 14 days turnaround including delivery (would have been 12 if not for the weekend) I already have a ClearZ 162 but wanted something a little more forgiving with a softer flex. Sidecut is about 10m which is good where I ride. Topsheet is JJSB basic but with orange print. I already have a plate for it (originally purchased with the ClearZ). We'll see how I like it better; with or without a plate... Sidecut is 9/11/10
    5 likes
  23. Trying something new this year - inhale during transitions, exhale throughout the carve. Kind of like how you're supposed to exhale during a bench press. I feel better and less winded this way. Give it a shot. Anyone else?
    5 likes
  24. January 21, 2004 We decided to do a day shot to Aspen for some carving -- hard boots, long alpine boards. It meant leaving Denver at 4AM, but Todd and I both had the day off, so we figured why not. Our connection, Larry, couldn’t make it, but he gave us Joey’s number in Aspen: “He’ll show you around.” Seemed fine with us. Slightly before 8AM, we rolled into town on a blue sky beauty of a day. Outside Joey’s condo was a PureCarve board, maybe 170cm or so, with Bomber bindings; we were at the right place, so we knocked and entered. Joey, Sparky, and Mike. Three gray-haired guys, all around 60, greeted us between sips of coffee, gulps of oatmeal, and trips to the bathroom. As they shuffled along, getting ready for a day of riding,Todd and I looked at each other -- what had we gotten ourselves into? These guys were our guides? We followed the gang to Buttermilk, via the Tiehack lift. They put on their helmets, laughing and needling each other continuously, put on their alpine boards, and up we went. At the top it was simply “follow us,” and they were gone. An alpine board carves an unbroken trench in the snow in the form of an arc, and you can place a #2 pencil in any part of the turn a good rider makes. Todd and I looked down at three sets of perfect turns, and we looked ahead as three riders disappeared beneath us. If we didn’t move fast, they’d be gone for good. We rode Tiehack, we rode Summit Express, and we rode Buttermilk West. And these guys didn’t stop: 2000 foot vertical runs, at speed, all morning, in the sunshine, on the groomers. Trenches everywhere. Lots of laughs, lots of turns, lots of stories. Lunch, then to Aspen Highlands for the steep stuff. The steep stuff now ? Do these guys ever stop? Yeah, about 3:00. We had a beer with the boys in the lodge at the base of Buttermilk. Mike and Sparky had flown in from California the day before, and this was their first day of the season. They were a bit tired, they admitted, as they laughed and told more stories. Outside the XGame frenzy -- it was starting in two days -- had already begun. Half pipes, loud music, and all the dudes. And I’m hanging with three “old” guys who make the best carved turns on the hill, turning the heads of just about everyone on the chair lifts as they rip on by. You want to talk about what riding is all about? Ride with these guys.
    5 likes
  25. 5 likes
  26. Ballitude some thing I was totally missing on the new to me virus 186 Gs(thanks again Jose!) I also thought it was one of my "special newly minted words," but no, its already in the urban dictionary. My definition is: noun, similar to intestinal fortitude, but originating a little lower on the body. Used in a sentence: " I did not have the ballitude to properly ride that 186 virus today, but I found it when I hopped on the 185 oxess" The virus scared me, but I quickly made the ox my bitch. hit some crazy speeds on that, over 54 max, and nearly 45 sustained, liking that new stick. I need to look at how the virus is setup, and get it ironed out, I could turn it, but I did not feel comfortable on it Crowds where light early on, but started getting heavier as the day progressed, as per normal. Groom was a little meh, and inconsistent, but it will get better as it gets mowed a little more, On the hill today The odd one, ,whom is so totally on the spectrum, James, little Miss Haley, Mr. Positively Awesome, Racer H and myself. Looking forward to getting back up on the hill on Monday, straightliner Geoff is under the impression that 8 might be open. Definitely enough snow, but I would bring a rock board for any riding over there Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukah, Happy solstice, and happy Kwanza to all! Mario
    5 likes
  27. I finally have something to post on this thread! My new toy arrived on the first day of winter! I can't wait to get it on real snow! It's a Coiler Nirvana Balance 172 w/ a 19cm waist!
    5 likes
  28. Looks like an all star crew this year! I fully expect to disrespect all the Homies. HB is ready to unleash a 55 gal drum of serious whoop ass on the locals. I just hope Jason and Gary are in fighting form:) Safe travels
    5 likes
  29. 4 likes
  30. Merci à tous pour les bons et beaux commentaires et d'être venu tout ça malgré la température polaire de samedi (-25*c avec le vent🌬☃️😪) Ont pourra dire que l'on a appris à rider dans un champs de balles de golf !!! Le souper à la microbrasserie Archibald à terminé cette journée en bonne compagnie et d'une façon merveilleuse avec le tirage de 2 planches costom... et oui !!! Dimanche cependant a été sublime. Nous avons carver très fort !!!!!! Les gens du Relais ont fait un travail merveilleux dans les pentes, tout cela accompagné d'un soleil radieux et d'un photographe hors pair 😉 Un GROS MERCI à Bruce Varsava grand maître COILER de s'être déplacé et d'avoir été si généreux!! Un GROS MERCI aussi à Réal de SWOARD , Henry Kim de APEX/KESSLER ainsi que Louis de FULLBAG de nous avoir accompagné et permis de faire l'essai de leurs produits. Poir ceux qui ont manqué la rencontre.... j'espère vous avoir donné le goût pour l'an prochain !!!🏂🏂🏂 des photos seront disponibles très bientôt... a l'an prochain 😃🏂🍻 Thanks to all for the good comments and to have come all this despite the polar temperature of Saturday (-25 * c with wind) You can say that you have learned to ride in a field of golf balls !!! The dinner at the microbrewery Archibald ended this day in good company and in a wonderful way with the draw of 2 boards costom ... HO yeah!!! Sunday however was sublime. We have carver very strong !!!!!! The people of the Relais have done a wonderful job on the slopes, all accompanied by a radiant sunshine and an outstanding photographer A BIG THANK YOU to Bruce Varsava Grand Master COILER for having moved and having been so generous !! A BIG THANK YOU also to Réal de SWOARD, Henry Kim of APEX / KESSLER and Louis de FULLBAG for having accompanied us and made it possible to test their products. For those who missed the meeting .... I hope to have given you the taste for next year !!! Photos will be available soon ... See you next year.
    4 likes
  31. For those interested in exploring tool dip and saving your riding gear, here some pictures of my gear. The Blue jacket and black pants have had tool dip spray on it for 4+ seasons and there is absolutely zero signs of wear. The Burton AK pants are 2 seasons old. I find it best if you run painters tape along a seam. I sprayed 6+ coats on them and then cut the tape off with a razor blade. What is awesome about this stuff is that you can peel it off and even use GooGone to get rid of any left over stuff. If there are signs of wear, tap them back up and put a few more coats on. If you wash the gear, turn it inside out as it may get some bubbles in it. I have tried gorilla tape, but that only last so long. Gorilla tape works really well on gloves and bonds well to leather. On the flip side tool dip does not bond to leather well at all and just peels off.
    4 likes
  32. So long as I don't get hurt, I love a massive yard sale. Lets me know I'm pushing it and always makes for the best stories.
    4 likes
  33. 4 likes
  34. And my Monster 188, Skunkworks warbird designed by Shred Grummer
    4 likes
  35. 172 AMT VSR with a 21cm waist. Had the gopro strapped to my leg...
    4 likes
  36. Welcome to the club! Most of my riding hits all those points. Narrow runs, hard snow, short vertical. Stay short, or at least with a tight sidecut. A 12m sidecut is about the upper limit for what I have fun on locally, unless it's the rare steep run. I have the most fun on a 9-10.5m sidecut. At 175-ish lbs, you're right in the sweet spot so most stock boards will be about the right stiffness. You didn't mention budget. My thoughts: Low budget: Watch for older slalom boards. 165 or shorter. They come and go on the classifieds. I really liked a Volkl 162 (163?) Renntiger SL when I was starting, and they're pretty common and cheap. Medium budget: Coiler Angry or XT-sidecut VSR model. Ice masters. I ride my 167 VSR most days locally, and the Angry when it's icy or I'm feeling energetic. High budget: The hot small board on this forum is the Donek MK. I'm loving my Donek Rev 163, but you need to be aggressive to get the most of it. I assume a Kessler SL board will have similar characteristics.
    4 likes
  37. I got a pair of SG bindings just recently and rode them for couple days. First observations : 1. Little stiffer then F2s 2. Easier to change your setup quickly for the cants/lifts etc, without screwing up your front and rear bracket position 3. You can change the size of the bindings from S to L with 30 minutes effort, so If like me you are on the border line of sizes you can choose what works better for you. 4. Hex bolts for everything - is it an advantage ? I was once frustrated when snow has melted and froze inside the hex nut and couldnt get it out to adjust the binding. On pozidrive you just dig with it :P. Overall I agree the hex is better and less prone to slip, when adjusting at home. 5. Front lever design - anyone broke the front lever in F2s? Good news on SG - you can easily assemble and dissamble the front lever without taking off the bail or buying whole new bracket. 6. Is it a binding revolution ? No its an evolution, but a most welcome one. All things evolved vs F2 make this binding a better choice. Its really good that you get all the mounting hardware, all lifts, cants in one set and the bindings come disassembled, so you can choose what lifts and cants to use. Anyone gets frustrated when you get a brand new F2s, but have to take them apart and put them back together? Or if you need an additional lift you have to buy additional one from the dealer just to get all the necessary hardware, i.e. long and medium F2 screws? Original screws for F2 are also a rare find in EU. 7. Is it worth the extra $? Depends what you are looking for. If you are not on a limited budget then go for SGs as they are less stressful and are way easier to operate. By F2s standards you get two sizes of binding for a price of one. On the other hand if you are on a budget you can get F2s sometimes really cheap from the outlets in EU say for approx 150 euros. Choice is yours.
    4 likes
  38. I hadn't ridden my Bomber Boiler Plate 4mm Light in about a year and was thinking of selling it. Then yesterday, the local bump had its opening day. I assume they have a new groomer operator. Wow, like a Detroit street! Ice, holes, waves, ridges, you name it. It sucked. Then I remembered that I had the BP in the car. Put that on the trusty new (to me) Donek Rev 163 and had a great day! Well, I still fell a lot because now I was overconfident, but I went from thinking about going home early to riding for 3 more hours. If I could absorb enough with my knees to keep the board on the snow, it just worked. Once airborne, the plate didn't help at all! ;) Not the best start to my season, but a good day of learning. My plate is not for sale, sorry!
    4 likes
  39. I actually shelved mine for a while so my fitness could catch up to how I wanted to ride the board. Once I got some real legs under me I was able to ride it for more than a few hours with ease. I want to take a lap clicker to the mountain one day to see how many turns I get in compared to my other boards. I was fortunate enough to have it out on absolute hero groom on Monday and Tuesday. You couldn't have wiped the smile off my face if you tried!
    4 likes
  40. Pick a Run...do it over and over and over and over and over until you know it well enough to forget where you are going, which will allow you to focus on what you are doing...
    4 likes
  41. Step 1, make sure you LOOK WHERE YOU WANT THE CARVE TO GO. This cannot be understated. If you're just looking downhill it's very easy for your technique to go out the window. At the beginning of each carve, sight ACROSS the trail to where you want to end up, and make it happen. DO NOT just stare aimlessly downhill.
    4 likes
  42. howdy all anyone know what's up with ExcelsiorTheFathead ... haven't heard from him since summer. his gypsy life style got me worried... he was a prolific poster... always interested in his adventures...
    4 likes
  43. Bruce has been busy. Got this UPS today. We changed the colors from black and white to blue and yellow. I call it my Swedish blue mamba. 178 Nirvana vcam with tight side cut, 20 cm wide. 1st test ride tomorrow.
    4 likes
  44. And once you have mastered walking in ski boots and hard snowboard boots high heels are the next footwear to be mastered ;-)
    4 likes
  45. 3 likes
  46. Hello Anyone who has surfed concrete, water or snow understands the magic feeling of simply carving a turn. Each board gives the rider a different and unique feeling when carving. Each board gives a unique feeling in a variety of conditions on concrete, water or snow. Each rider and shaper are often compelled to search for an improved or magic feeling when carving, a feeling that they dream about. I love this quote from the Korua builders: Happiness should lie in the process of finding your matching shape. In this process there is no right or wrong nor a goal, since every character has different forms and every form has different characters. May you never find your perfect shape. Enjoy the Search, enjoy your quiver! Rob
    3 likes
  47. 179 Coiler Revelation; 13-14m scr, 20.5cm waist. Basically a race board build geared toward hardpack to icy groom, with a slightly softer and decambered nose, and stiffer tail and mid section to provide some pop into the next turn, all with a near radial "recreational" sidecut .
    3 likes
  48. A thought exercise that clicked for me: Don't move your weight forward - slide the board rearward under you. Think of standing on the flats, and needing to pull the nose back to let someone by. Then, as going through the turn, slide the board forward under you. So you start the turn with the board slid rearward (weight towards nose), and finish the turn with the board slid forward (weight towards tail). How much you slide it changes the turn radius.
    3 likes
  49. This is a 'grab' from Freecarve, because I'm lazy, and didn't want to yet again type the dang thing out... On 3/14/2006 PSR wrote in from 216.66.xxx.xxx: John, try just a modest amount of stance adustment along the board's length, say move both binders forward,um, 3/4" or so. That 'may' allieviate some of the leg-burn syndrome. However, what also needs to occur is that you RELAX, use less 'pressure' down into the board's edge, but increase Edge angle to keep the carves clean. Most riders tend towards rolling up to 40* or so, and that's still in the weight-on-the-base realm. Put your board up to 60*, and there's no 'fudging' the turn arc, as your weight is now more on the sidewall than base. It's scary at times, as the board has to be twisted or bent to change the arc-in-progress, and [almost] no skidding can occur without 'blowing out' of your intended line. The trick then is ride up high on the edge, but with a much lighter touch, and use the bootcuffs like Joysticks to increase/decrease edging or steering input. Using the knees to aim the edge means that the hips are now 'left' or 'right' as much as they're front or rear. When using this tactic, it also lets the knees 'float' to increase shock absorbtion while you're way up on the edge/sidewall. Speed control now is a function of setting the edge early, or taking the arc into a 'crossing the Fall Line' completion. This means, btw, that small bumps get trenched thru, not skimmed over. To get the 'way-up-on-edge' feel, use a moderate slope that's got good width and grooming. Try to get up on 'tip-toes' really early, and stretch into the turn slowly from a soft crouched position. If you got the timing right, you'll still have 'stretch room' left when you've made a full "C" turn. For Heelside carves, roll the lead hip forward And down, pull the Toes UP, and then get both knees rolling into the edging. Again, stretch slowly, not quite getting to standing tall by the time your "C" turn is finished. To link this style carve, let your board carry some speed from turn-to-turn and use the length of the "C" shape govern your momentum. With the stance of 45*, you're on 'the diagonal', where you can still use toes/heels for edging pressure. You can now also move fore/aft with Power to help pressure/unweight the board (this,btw,is Hardbooting's biggest advantage in turning over softies. It's not about boot stiffness, it's about Leverage along the Diagonals!). Leaning at the boot cuffs side-to-side is also usable for creating edge tipping. Torsional twist is also near an optimum as that means of bending/edging can be selectively employed AND convey power transfer fore and aft (again, along the diagonal). Angles set above 45* say 66*F/60*R use the boot as a lever, but the toe/heel feel is somewhat taken away while fore/aft pressuring is enhanced. Carving becomes easy, but using a soft edge-feel or balancing while going slow gets to be more difficult. Riders often use higher angles due to board width, and the skinnier the board is, harder it is to keep the toes/heels from dragging in deep turns. Angles set below the 30's tend to distinctly curtail fore/aft pressuring, and tend to create a bias towrds using the toes/heels for edge leverage, and the knees/hips cannot 'drive' forward to create truly powerful carves. However, a soft-touch is enhanced as is low-speed stability. Softbooters using a 'duck' stance, with the toes pointing towards the board's ends are using that 'soft touch' bias along the toeside edge for better low-speed balance (good for jibbing rails and ollies) while sacrificing knee-steering and power on the heelside edge (as the highbacks are now leveraging the board's center, not along the diagonal). Having a 'directional' stance, with both feet pointing towards the nose is what you want for higher-speed turns. Putting your feet at angles that let you focus edging power along the entire board's length is better yet. The range of angles between 27* and 60* are where a rider can best affect the board's edging with the most power, control, finesse, and blend of fore/aft And side-to-side pressuring. So, yeah, 45* would be "Good" in my book.
    3 likes
  50. Watching Corey's video reinforces something that I had to discover on my own. When I am carving badly, I'm traversing a wide slope on my uphill edge and I slowly roll the board onto the downhill edge, wait for it to engage and try to ride it around to the next transition. This usually results in big-radius curves, high speed and skidding to control my speed. What I'm trying to make "muscle memory" is when I am traversing a wide slope on my uphill edge, I "throw" my weight downhill to firmly engage the downhill edge. Once the downhill edge is engaged, it easily carves on its own around the turn. This usually results in tighter turns and lower speeds. However, I find it very unnatural to throw your body downhill. This seems go against all sense of self-preservation. However, I find that if I trust that the edge will engage, it works out pretty well. Also, when you think about it, it makes sense: a turn should initiate about 1/2 way across a traverse - not at the end of the traverse. I think this is apparent in the video when you can see the bases of the boards from uphill (on the riders that are doing this correctly).
    3 likes